Lília Mestre

Meeting Through

Materialities, Bodies, and Words

Ongoing research-creation project initiated by Lília Mestre with the support of a PCYIA Grant 2023-24​

Meeting Through… is an ongoing research-creation project that employs choreographic research as a way of instigating new passageways of socio-political and environmental awareness. It is a collaboration exploring touch, movement and fabulation as modalities that connect bodies with their environment.

The project departs from a basic premise: that in our detachment from the chain of production, we have become de-sensitized to the communicative, imaginative, dimensions of our embodied tactile experience of the world. We evade the ecological damage it causes, the histories of the people who make them and the place they come from. In response to this situation, Meeting Through. . .attempts to reinvigorate our curiosity with the banal, contingent, materials of our environment. It investigates the relationships between human bodies, everyday life materials, and their political contexts with the hypothesis that, through touch, dance, sound, and storytelling, we can practice bringing these connections to the fore.

Meeting Through… wants to invite this ethical awareness into the room by engaging with a series of fabricated commodities that we use in daily life, such as mobile phones, clothes, chairs, the marley dance floor; raw materials such as clay, wood, and artificial materials such as Styrofoam and latex to disclose their relational histories. But also, to disclose the joys and potential for community building by intently creating other possible stories and futures with them.

One could argue that the body in movement (such as dance) is detached from objects (such as commodities) and concepts (philosophy and politics). But my interest lies in the idea that there is always-already an underlying interaction between these domains. Engaging with their relational histories enables a speculative framework (such as poetics) to imagine possible other futures.

Meeting Through… is an ongoing research-creation project that employs choreographic research as a way of instigating new passageways of socio-political and environmental awareness. It is a collaboration exploring touch, movement and fabulation as modalities that connect bodies with their environment.

The project departs from a basic premise: that in our detachment from the chain of production, we have become de-sensitized to the communicative, imaginative, dimensions of our embodied tactile experience of the world. We evade the ecological damage it causes, the histories of the people who make them and the place they come from. In response to this situation, Meeting Through. . .attempts to reinvigorate our curiosity with the banal, contingent, materials of our environment. It investigates the relationships between human bodies, everyday life materials, and their political contexts with the hypothesis that, through touch, dance, sound, and storytelling, we can practice bringing these connections to the fore.

Meeting Through… wants to invite this ethical awareness into the room by engaging with a series of fabricated commodities that we use in daily life, such as mobile phones, clothes, chairs, the marley dance floor; raw materials such as clay, wood, and artificial materials such as Styrofoam and latex to disclose their relational histories. But also, to disclose the joys and potential for community building by intently creating other possible stories and futures with them.

One could argue that the body in movement (such as dance) is detached from objects (such as commodities) and concepts (philosophy and politics). But my interest lies in the idea that there is always-already an underlying interaction between these domains. Engaging with their relational histories enables a speculative framework (such as poetics) to imagine possible other futures.

Witnessing practice by Diego Gil
Participants

Aaron Richmond
Heather Anderson
Valentina Plata
VK Preston
Esteban Donoso
Diego Gil
Magali Babin
Jacob Wren
Lília Mestre
Peng Hsu
Lydia Graveline

Witnessing practice by Diego Gil